‘Time Moveth Not, Our Being ‘Tis That Moves . . . 1882’

Carpet of blue. The Bluebells, we were told, were late in blooming, these were said to be at only 50 percent, peak yet to come. Fifty percent was 100 percent good enough for us.
An estate, where Bluebells rule, was 50 percent from peak, we were told–100 percent good enough for us.

Cornwall Cogitation #14, Sunday 8 May 2016–Artist Walter Langley (1852-1922) gave the “Time Moveth Not . . .” title to a watercolour of an elderly woman sitting at a table, surrounded by rusticity, her right elbow on an open Bible, her cheek resting on her fist, her lost-in-thought gaze pointed slightly beyond her feet. The painting is on display at the Penlee House Gallery & Museum in Penzance.

I thought of the painting in a chance meeting on the sidewalk along St Ives Road in Carbis Bay. An elderly woman with a walker was waiting in the refuge in the middle of the road. A car stopped to let her finish crossing. We were coming along the sidewalk just then. She commented on today’s volume and speed of traffic rushing  to and fro, recalling the days when she pushed a pram up and down the same street.

While time may stand still in contrast to the changes we experience in life, it’s the latter, our being, that moves to a fullness, a ripeness, a sacred sum, a blessing to the young, a life review, a celebration of  the times we are graced to live in.

So we wrap up our stay in Cornwall. We travel home in the coming week. St Anta people gave us a farewell card and blessing this morning. A moment of shared grace. How has the week just past added to our being? Let the photos tell some of the story.

6 May. A feast day for body, mind and spirit

We had a day out with Noel and Lynne Brereton at the Enys Estate near Flushing, a walk out of Truro, Evensong at Truro Cathedral, and dinner at Beck’s Fish & Chips.

 

Frieze above one of the doors of Truro Cathedral, Jesus blesses the children.
Frieze above one of the doors of Truro Cathedral, Jesus blesses the children. Securing the future for children, creation, and the church calls us to extraordinary and ordinary blessing as Jesus blessed.

 

We again attended Evensong after a day of seeing bluebells and doing a walk out of Truro.
We attended Evensong after a day of seeing bluebells and doing a walk out of Truro.
Marty, Jan, Lynne and Noel stand on the steps of the footbridge across the train tracks at Truro Station, the start of a walk outside the city.
Marty, Jan, Lynne and Noel stand on the steps of the footbridge across the train tracks at Truro Station, the start of a walk outside the city.
Flourishing, fulfilling its purpose in creation.
Flourishing, fulfilling its purpose in creation.
Up the granite step, through the woods, and back into the city.
Up the granite step, through the woods, back into the city.
Bluebells we saw at Enys Estate, near Truro. Primroses get their due in the foreground.
Bluebells at Enys Estate.
Stories, laughter, and more on the day out we shared.
Stories, laughter, and food marked the day we shared.

2 May. On the double-decker after a long walk

After long walk we rode the double decker bus on back roads to Lands End. Milking time road-crossing brought out the cameras.
We rode the double decker bus on back roads to Land’s End. Milking-time brought out the cameras.

 

 

I told the bus driver that had he stopped at Jelberts in Newlyn I'd have bought him a tub of ice cream. Driving back roads must be stressful yet all traffic seems to take it in stride.
I told the bus driver that had he stopped at Jelberts in Newlyn, an 80-year-old family enterprise, I’d have bought him a tub of their delicious ice cream. Driving these narrow, winding  roads must be stressful, yet all traffic seems to take it in stride.

 

4 May. Tehidy Woods with the West Cornwall Footpath Preservation Society

Sweet song of Spring.
We started with the Blackbird’s sweet song of spring, outside our door.
Margaret Cartwright (and husband Tim) led a walk through Tehidy Woods and along the coast.
Margaret Cartwright (and husband Tim) led the  walk through Tehidy Woods and along the coast.
Thirty-one of us gathered for the Tehidy Woods walk, among carpets of Bluebells.
Thirty-one of us walked among carpets of Bluebells.
Keep ringing, Bluebell.
Keep ringing, Bluebells.
Jan and Marty on the coast path, part of the Tehidy walk.
Jan and Marty on the coast path, part of the Tehidy walk.
Wildflowers blanket the wild granite coast along the Atlantic.
Primroses blanket the wild granite coast along the Atlantic.

6 May. More of our visual feast at Enys Estate

Parting thought: “Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem–neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken, 1917.

Best! -John. Time for one more picture? Well, actually five.  Let being gird your week.

 

3 thoughts on “‘Time Moveth Not, Our Being ‘Tis That Moves . . . 1882’

  1. Sad to think that your time in Cornwall has moveth to a close but I’m grateful to have had the chance to spend some of it there with you and to enjoy the rest vicariously through your blog and pictures. Safe travels!

    Like

  2. I’ll miss your Corwell comunication every week. Will you find anything in Elkhart to report on every week? Welcome home!! MM

    Like

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